PERFIL

 

 
CITY SOCIO ECONOMIC PROFILE
 

Volume II Part I
POPULATION AND LAND USE

Chapter III
The Local Economy

 

2.3.2.5        Agricultural Marketing

         Palay Marketing

It was cited that about 70% of the local requirement for palay is being imported from General Santos City, Iloilo City and Zamboanga del Sur. However, during peak season of harvest for palay production, palay is exported to Basilan, Jolo, Tawi-Tawi, and Zamboanga del Norte (Siocon).

 

        Vegetable Marketing

Discussions on vegetable marketing are directly drawn from the marketing and Information Needs Assessment Report, Zamboanga City of the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (1994).

Vegetables are mostly produced in barangay La Paz in Zamboanga City. Vegetables raised include Baguio beans, cabbage, carrots, Chinese petchay, and native pechay.

Vegetables are sold by the farmers on wholesale basis at the farm level to traders and middlemen and are available the whole year round. The peak of production and trading are during the months of November to January. Vegetables produced in Zamboanga City are traded in Sulu, Basilan and Tawi-Tawi.

During lean months (February to October), the city imports vegetables from other areas like Cagayan de Oro City, Negros Oriental, Metro Manila and Zamboanga del Sur. Vegetables are also imported from Pagadian (tomato) and General Santos City (e.g., cabbage, Baguio beans).

There are several participants in the marketing of vegetables in Zamboanga City. The farmers produce the vegetables in their own farms. These are normally purchased from them on wholesale basis by the barangay assembler. A barangay assembler buys vegetables from one barangay and sells it to traders. There are also interregional distributors who source vegetables from two or more regions and sell to retailers as well as to buyers outside the province.

There are suppliers or buyers outside the province who buy vegetables from Zamboanga city and sell vegetables in their province. Retailers sell vegetables directly to the consumers, the end users.

 

          Banana Marketing

There are at least four varieties of banan grown in Zamboanga city. These are the latundan, lakatan, and bungulan, and gardaba.

Bananas are grown in Zamboanga City the whole year round. The peak-trading season is from August to October. Lean months are from January to April. Farmers produce the banana in their own farms and sell their produce to large distributors. There are also farmers who sell their produce to large distributors and buyers outside of the province. The retailers buy banana from large distributors and sell in the market (BAS, 1994).

Geographically, though, bananas are being traded in Zamboanga City and then supplied within the city, Zamboanga del Norte and Metro Manila.

 

 

         Fish Marketing

Most of the fish produced at the commercial level in Zamboanga city is unloaded at the Sangali Fish landing Center. Tuloy and galunggong are the major species. Fish species handled for the export market include squid, octopus, lobster and other large fish species

The Boulevard Fish Landing Center is a small fish-landing center that can accommodate only two vessels at a time. The said landing center handles many small fish species in small volumes. The fish species commonly landed are tuloy and galunggong.

Small fisherman sells to the assemblers, exporters, and retailers or directly to the consumers. The commercial fisherman sells to exporters, buyers outside of the province to buy the fish. The retailers sell fish to consumers and usually have stalls in the market.

Geographically, fish are traded in Zamboanga City. These are distributed to Zamboanga City, Metro Manila, Zamboanga del Norte, Cagayan de Oro City, and Lanao del Norte.

 

2.3.2.6        Agrarian Reform

              Scope of the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP)

A total of 187, 839 hectares of agricultural lands are considered under the CARP. Of these, 110, 257 hectares are private agricultural lands (PAL) and 87, 582 hectares are classified as non-PAL1. Private agricultural lands tenanted rice and corn lands covered by presidential Decree No. 27, Voluntary Offer to Sell (VOS), Voluntary Land transfer (VLT0, lands foreclosed by Government Financial Institutions (GFIs), and lands under Compulsory Acquisition (CA).2

 

              CARP Accomplishment

As of first semester of 1997, a total of 176, 782 hectares of agricultural lands have already been acquired and distributed under the CARP in Zamboanga City. These constitute about 94% of the targeted CARP scope in the City.

Disaggregation of date on accomplishment by type of land revealed that the land tenure improvement (LTI) aspect of the CARP has been completed (i.e., 100% accomplished) among non-PAL (both KKK lands and settlements). Moreover, there are 100% CARP accomplishments among tenanted rice and corn lands under the PD 27 Agrarian Reform Program.

High percentages of accomplishment are also noted for land under the VLT (97%), GFIs (96%), and VOS (90%). The unfinished business of agrarian reform mainly involves lands for compulsory acquisition of greater than 24 to 50 hectares in which only about one-third of the target has been acquired and distributed. These are the medium-sized agricultural lands, which are quite difficult to acquire.

 

 

            Figure III-12.   Market Channels for Vegetables, Zamboanga City

 

            Figure III-13.   Geographic Flow of Banana, Zamboanga City

 

 

            Figure III-14.   Market Channels for Fish, Zamboanga City

 

 

            Figure III-15.   Geographic Flow of fish, Zamboanga City

 

 

Table III-17.   Land Distribution Status By Land Type/Mode Of Coverage, 1972 – 1st Semester 1997

Land Type

CARP Scope

Accomplish-
ment

(%)

Balance

Tenanted Rice/Corn

VOS

VLT

GFI-owned

CA (greater than 50 (has)

CA (greater then 25-50 has)

CA (greater then 5-24 has)

       Total (PAL)

KKK Lands

Settlements

      Total (Non-PAL)

Grand Total

10, 820. 00

22, 746. 00

31, 357. 00

9, 985. 00

6, 914. 00

5, 924. 00

12, 493. 00

100, 257. 00

63, 772. 00

23, 810. 00

87, 582. 00

187, 389. 00

10, 820. 00

20, 542. 00

30, 473. 00

9, 545. 00

5, 281. 00

1, 851. 00

10, 688. 00

89, 200. 00

63, 772. 00

23, 810. 00

87, 582. 00

176, 782. 00

 

100. 00

90. 31

97. 18

95. 59

76. 38

31. 15

85. 55

88. 97

100. 00

100. 00

100. 00

94. 11

0.00

2, 204. 00

884. 00

440. 00

1, 633.00

4, 091. 00

1, 805. 00

11, 057. 00

0.00

0.00

0.00

11, 057. 00

 

  

            Land for Acquisition and Distribution

To date, there are 11, 057 hectares of land for acquisition and distribution under the CARP in Zamboanga city. These mostly include some 7, 529 hectares of land under Compulsory Acquisition and 2, 204 hectares of land under the Voluntary land Transfer.

 

            Agrarian Reform Communities (ARCs)

To date, there are four ARCs in Zamboanga City. These are located in the barangays of Buenavista, Sta. Rita, Lumayang, and Patalon. These are the areas where there is 100% accomplishment on LTI, i.e., and the delivery of support services to CARP beneficiaries are focused on these ARCs. It could be noted that the delivery of support (and even social) services in these areas ARCs are anchored on the cooperatives existing in the respective areas.

 

            Land Use Conversion

There are eight applications for land use conversion with the DAR from January 1991-August 1997. About 146. 58 hectares of land are being applied for conversion. Of these areas, about 73% are being applied for conversion to industrial areas. The rest of the areas are for residential purposes. While the area being applied for conversion may appear very minimal. There may also be cases of illegal and/or undocumented land use conversion.

 

 

2.3.3   Trade and Industry

2.3.3.1 Business Establishments

Based on the recent Barangay land Use Survey, actual count of business establishments total 8, 121. The breakdown of which is shown in Table III-18.

 

Table III-18.   Business Establishments, Zamboanga City
 

Functions/Services

No. Of Establishments

TOTAL

8, 121

 

 

Manufacturing:

422

            Agro-processing

179

            Handicrafts

26

            Bakery

208

            Coco-oil Mill

9

 

 

Agriculture:

485

             Agri-aqua farm

322

             Lower Farms

43

             Poultry/Piggery

120

 

 

Trade:

5, 112

              Sari-sari Store

4, 591

              Grocery

161

              Shopping mall

18

              Supermarket

4

              Flea market

84

              Pamilihang Bayan

5

              Drugstore

81

              Hardware

82

              Appliance Store

37

              Flower shop

49

 

 

Transportations and Communications:

131

              Trucker/Cargo Handling

51

              Oil/Gas Depot

20

              Shipyard

6

              Radio Station

30

              TV Station

7

               Boating Facilities

17

 

 

Table III-18.   (Cont’d) Business Establishments, Zamboanga City
 

Functions/Services:

No. Of Establishments

 

 

Tourism-Related

188

              Resorts

23

              Travel Agency

15

              Disco Club/Ballroom

10

              Pension House

10

              Swimming Pool

7

              Hotel

6

              Inn

3

              Cultural Center

3

              Sports Complex/Stadium

4

              Lodging House

15

              Restaurant

92

 

 

Agriculture Support

225

              Rice Mill

90

              Corn Mill

15

              Slaughter House

9

              Warehouse (palay)

111

 

 

Community, Social and Personal

1, 558

              Movie house

57

              Cockpit

8

              Motel

17

              Bowling Alley

2

              Karaoke/Videoke

86

              Beerhouse

129

              Carinderia

449

              Others

810

 

 

2.3.3.2  Industries

Major Industries

Based on export figures for almost a decade (1989-1997), there are four (4) major industries in the city. These are as follows:

            Processed marine-based products

            Coconut-based products

            Furniture and wood products

            Gifts, toys and house wares

Table III-19 below shows that the processed marine-based products (composed primarily of canned tuna and other marine/aquaculture products) compose almost 60% of the total exports; followed by coconut-based products, 32%; furniture/wood products, 6%; and gifts, toys and house wares, 1%.

Table III- 19.   Export Performance, FOB Value (In Million US$), Zamboanga City,
1989-1997 (January-July)

Major Industries

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

% Share

Coconut-Based Products

 

 

32.687

20.02

30.085

44.81

77.182

56.478

43.848

313.11

32.52

Processed Aqua-marine Products

30.63

29. 46

55.682

54.02

61.591

74.536

98.543

93.234

78.517

576.22

59.85

Processed Food

 

 

 

0.001

 

0.032

0.503

0.306

0.166

1.008

0.10

Gifts, Toys and House wares

0.819

0.956

1.161

1.721

2.102

1.65

1.396

1.755

1.046

12.606

1.31

Furniture/ Wood Products

16.82

18.44

11.298

5.721

2.269

4.115

0.204

0.892

 

59.767

6.21

Total

48.27

48.87

100.82

81.48

104.04

125.14

177.82

152.66

123.57

962.71

100%

 

 

Figure III-18 shows the trading flows of these commodities from Zamboanga City

 

 

 

Figure III-16.  Export Performance, FOB Values, Zamboanga City

 

 

 

 

 

Figure-17.   Export Performance of Major Industries,

Zamboanga City, 1987-1996

 

 

 

 

Figure III-18.   Export Trade for Zamboanga City, January-June, 1997

                                    (In Million Dollars)

 

 

 

Processed Marine Products

Marine-based products processors have continuously been in the major export earners of the city. For the past five years, exports of processes marine-based products averaged 50, 000 MT annually. In 1997, January-June exports figures reveal that the city has already exported 41, 842 MT. Thus, it is expected that it will surpass the average annual exports for the year.

Table III-20. Average Annual Exports, Processed Marine Products (Volume In Million Kgs.), Zamboanga City, 1992-1996

Product

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

Total

Average

Canned Tuna

46. 708

25. 036

27. 283

35. 720

34. 067

168. 814

33. 763

Bottled Sardines

 

 

 

0. 001

0. 001

0. 002

0. 001

Pet foods

3.761

7. 572

5.899

5. 633

6. 674

29. 559

5. 912

Fish Meat

 

1. 834

0. 504

0. 398

 

2. 736

0. 912

Fresh/Dried Fish

0. 098

0. 032

0. 079

0. 010

0. 007

0. 226

0. 045

Dried Sea cucumber

 

 

 

0. 016

0. 024

0. 040

0. 020

Processed Marine Products

2.420

1.515

4. 165

5. 023

3. 589

16. 712

3. 342

Seaweeds

0.512

1.530

4. 354

8. 866

13. 511

29. 273

5. 855

Total

53.519

37.519

42. 784

55. 667

57. 873

247. 362

49. 850

 

The top export is canned tuna, which totaled US$ 414. 55 million or 72% of the exports of the industry and followed by pet food, fish meal and bottled sardines for the same period. Other products are either fresh or semi-processed as dried and frozen. These are exotic marine products such as octopus, cuttlefish, squid, lobster, oyster, seaweeds, sea sponges, sea cucumber, shark fin/liver oil/meat/skin and a variety of exotic shells.

At present, there are 46 registered producers in the city, either selling in the domestic market or exporting worldwide.
 

Table III-21.   Export Performance, FOB Value (In Million US$), Processed marine-Based products, Zamboanga City, 1989-1997 (January-July)

Products 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Total Ave. % Share
Canned Tuna 26. 168 22.640 48.810 42.647 46.400 53.631 67.507 65.479 41.267 414.549 46.061 71.91%
Bottled Sardines             0.001 0.001   0.002 0.001 0.00
Pet Food 0.865 1.691 1.312 4.125 8.064 7.318 7.499 7.443 2.856. 41.173 4.575 7.14
Fish Meal         1.299 0.209 0.138     1.646 0.549 0.29
0.045 0.045 0.0244 0.064 0.053 0.035 0.436 0.038 0.070   0.985 0.123 0.17
Dried Sea Cucumber             0.029 0.072   0.101 0.051 0.02
Processed Marine Products 3.320 4.312 5.300 7.170 5.096 10.443 16.511 18.899 28.554 99.515 11.057 17.26
Seaweeds 0.326 0.582 0.196 0.250 0.697 2.499 6.821 1.270 5.840 18.481 2.053 3.21
Total 30.634 29.469 55.682 54.245 61.591 74.536 98.544 93.234 78.517 576.452 64.470 100.00%
Source: DTI

Seven (7) producers exporting 33, 763 metric tons to U.S.A., Canada, Japan are producing canned tuna, and European Union markets. Pet foods and seaweeds are exported to Japan, New Zealand, Australia, U.S.A., Canada and France in increasing volume.

 

            Figure III-19.   Export Performance, FOB Value (In Million US$)

                        Processed Marine-Based Products, Zamboanga City

 

There are 26 producers of other processes marine products who export to U.S.A., European Union, (Spain, Germany, Finland), Japan, HongKong, Taiwan, China, South Korea and Canada.

Table III-22.   Market/Production Profile, Processed Marine Products, Zamboanga City

Product

No. Of Producers

Production

Ave. Annual Exports (kg)

Market

Canned Tuna

7

21, 600 mt/year

190 tons/day

10, 000 boxes/month

33, 763

U.S., Canada, Japan, EU (UK, Belgium, W. Germany, Switzerland, Sweden), Domestic Market

Bottled Sardines

1

n. d.*

0.001

n. d.

Pet Food

1

n. d.

5. 912

Japan

Fish Meal

2

n. d.

9.12

n. d.

Fresh/Dried Fish

6

10, 000 Boxes/mo.

0. 045

Davao, Cebu, Manila, Cotabato

Processed Marine Products

26

n. d.

3. 362

U.S.A., Canada, Japan

Seaweeds

11

1,440 mt

5. 855

New Zealand, Australia, Japan, U.S.A., Canada, France, Domestic Market

Non-Precious Corals/ Sea shells

19

n. d.

0. 401

S. Korea, U.S.A., Japan, Canada, EU

(Italy, U.K., France, Germany)

 

*n. d. – no date

The area around the City is known to have exotic marine resources, thus allowing the industry to enjoy an adequate supply of raw materials

Aside from the abundance of raw materials, the City has a fishing port complex with a refrigeration capacity of 815 MT, and which could provide the much needed support facility for the industry. However, this is not enough. Refrigerated vans are inadequate to transport the products abroad. There is also a concern for poor handling and lack of skilled labor in the industry

The industry has high potentials as evidenced by recent investments (See Table III-23 below):

Table III-23.   Processes Marine-Based Products, BOI-Registered Investments, Zamboanga City, 1994-1997

Year

Product/Activity

Type of project

Project Cost (In P million)

Employment

1994

Export producer on Prawn

Processed Food or Canned Tuna

Cold Storage

Canned Pet Foods

Existing

 

 

New

 

New

New

8.2

 

 

72.628

 

11. 716

77. 742

 

 

 

2, 035

 

8

50

1996

Tuna Fishing

New

171. 6

168

1997

Refined Carrageenan, Semi-carrageenan & Chips

New

190

100

Total

 

 

531. 886

2, 361

 

            Coconut Based Products

 

There are three (3) major registered coconut producers capable of crushing 1, 030 metric ton copra per day.

Products of the city include coconut oil, coconut-solvents/pellets. Coconut oil is exported mainly to China, Europe and U.S.A. For almost a decade, the industry has already exported US$ 313.112 million worth of products or an average of US$ 34. 79 annually. Exports have been erratic though, with 1995 as the banner year, registering US$ 77. 182 million exports. From 1992-1995, the volume of exports increased, but it dropped in 1996 to 98.588 metric tons from the previous years of 190. 489 metric tons.

 

Table III-24.   Export Performance, Coconut-Based Products, FOB Value (In Million US$), 
             Zamboanga City, 1989-1997 (January-July)

Product 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Total Ave. Share
Coconut Oil     27.620 20.022 31.944 39.937 70.970 52.260 37.723 280.476 40.068 89.27
Coco Solvents/Pellets     5.071 2.813 4.402 4.872 6.212 4.218 2.621 30.209 4.316 12.36
Deodorized Oil                 0.824 0.824 0.824 2.36
Coconut Oil                 2.670 2.670 2.670 7.65
Coco Acid Oil Distillates 0               0.011 0.011 0.011 0.03
Total .000 0.000 32.691 22.835 36.346 44.809 77.182 56.478 43.849 314.190 34.910 100.00
Source: DTI

In 1997, the industry has diversified to exporting deodorized oil, Cochin oil and coco-acid distillates, which together with the usual exports of coconut and coco solvents/pellets generated 88, 516 metric tons of exports for January-July.

 

Table III- 25.   Export Performance, Coconut-Based Products (Volume in Million Kg.), Zamboanga City, 1992-1997 (January-July)

 

Product

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

Share

Coconut Oil

Coco Solvents/Pellets

Deodorized Oil

Coconut Oil

Coco Acid Oil Distillates

Total

32.250

24.500

 

 

 

56.750

72.078

40.950

 

 

 

113.028

82.041

54.045

 

 

 

136.086

117.533

72.956

 

 

 

190.489

69.109

29.179

 

 

 

98.288

56.899

26.400

1.200

4.000

0.017

88.516

429.910

248.030

1.200

4.000

0.017

683.157

71.652

41.338

0.200

0.667

0.003

113.860

62.93

36.31

0.18

0.59

0.00

100.00

 

Source: DTI

In 1995, a newcomer to the industry invested P1.43 million for the processing of organic chemicals: Cauric Acid, glycerine, and short chain fatty acid, employing 500 persons.

 

Furniture and Wood Products

The industry is a sunset industry in Zamboanga City. Export figures show that the industry has generated nil exports earnings for the past two years. In previous years, products exported included plywood, veneer, and other wood products, rattan components, furniture components, wood tiles and others. Since 1995, exports of wooden furniture have generated US$ 1.332 million for 413 metric tons of products.

 

 

 

 

Figure III-20.   Export Performance, Coconut-Based Products,

FOB Value (In Million US$), Zamboanga City, 1989-1997 (January-July)

 

 

 

Figure III-21.   Export Performance, Coconut-Based production

Volume in Million Kg.), Zamboanga City, 1992-1997 (Janueary-July)

 

Table III-26.   Export Performance, Furniture and Wood Products, FOB Value (In Million US $), Zamboanga city, 1989-1997 (January-July)

Product

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

Share

Plywood

6.314

12.429

5.832

2.836

1.619

 

 

 

 

29.021

5.804

46.89

Lumber

6.760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.760

6.760

10.92

Veneer

3.659

6.797

4.518

2.659

0.885

3.793

 

 

 

22.311

3.719

36.05

Wooden Spacer

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.00

Other Wood Products

 

0.072

0.484

0.002

0.038

0.247

 

 

 

0.843

0.169

1.36

Charcoal

0.010

0.050

 

 

0.658

 

 

 

 

0.718

0.239

1.16

Lumber Core

 

 

0.005

0.156

 

0.053

 

 

 

0.214

0.071

0.35

Platform Lumber

 

 

0.469

0.068

 

 

 

 

 

0.537

0.269

0.87

Wood Tile

 

 

 

 

0.55

0.022

 

 

 

0.077

0.039

0.12

Wooden Furniture

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.204

0.892

0.236

1.332

0.444

2.15

Rattan Components

0.073

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.073

0.073

0.12

Furniture Components

0.006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.006

0.006

0.00

Total

16.823

19.348

11.299

5.721

3.255

4.115

0.204

0.892

0.236

61.893

17.593

100.00

 

Source: DTI

 

There are five (5) registered producers of lumber, veneer, plywood and parquet in the City, and two (2) furniture makers. Some investments on related products are as follows:

Table III-27.   Registered Producers of Wood-Related Products

Year

Product/Activity

Type of Project

Project Cost (In P million)

Employment

1994

Particle Board

New

129.84

61

1996

Stainless Steel Panel Board

New

4.00

40

Total

 

 

133.84

101

 

                Source: DTI

 

Within the recent economic development in the city brought about by the Regional Agro-Industrial Center (RAIC), the ZAMBOECOZONE and BIMP-EAGA initiatives, the industry could provide the needed backward linkages for a construction industry. Wood manufacturers such as furniture components, parts and furnishings have high potentials.

 

Gifts and Housewares

At present there are 46 producers in the gifts and Housewares industry which include producers of woodcraft, shell craft, ceramics, leather craft, novelty items, hand-woven cloth, dried and artificial flowers/plants, Christmas decors and other manufactures gift items. It is reportedly dominated by cottage-type enterprises due to the low capital requirement of its operation.

The industry is one of the dollar earners for the city with exports amounting to US$ 12.274 million for almost a decade now. The highest exports were registered in 1993 when US$ 2.102 million products were sold abroad. Button blanks, rubber cup lump and shell craft dominated the exports of the industry to U.S.A., Japan and European Union (Greece, Italy and Netherlands).

 

Table III-28.   Export Performance, Gifts and Housewares Industry, FOB Value (In Million US$), Zamboanga City, 1989-1997 (January-July)

Product

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

%Share

Button Blanks

0.451

0.580

0.665

0.319

0.985

0.660

0.389

0.445

0.134

4.628

0.514

37.70

Shell Craft

0.291

0.233

0.401

0.207

0.320

0.723

0.692

0.641

0.367

3.875

0.431

31.57

D. Cowhide

0.010

0.058

0.079

0.091

0.110

0.110

0.130

0.130

0.075

0.793

0.088

6.46

Carabao Horn Stick

 

0.012

0.016

0.033

 

 

 

 

 

0.061

0.020

0.50

Handicraft

0.012

0.018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.030

0.015

0.24

Retort Wheels

0.016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.016

0.016

0.13

Woodcraft

0.028

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.028

0.028

0.23

Electric Switchboard

0.003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.003

0.003

0.02

Brassier

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.00

Paint

0.000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.000

0.000

0.000

Decoration Stones

0.006

0.033

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.039

0.039

0.032

Rubber Cup lump

 

 

 

0.550

0.593

0.072

 

 

 

1.215

0.405

9.90

Abaca Mittens

 

0.022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.022

0.022

0.18

Ornamental Shell

 

 

 

 

0.040

0.012

0.079

0.378

0.067

0.576

0.115

4.69

Shell Toys

 

 

 

 

0.024

 

 

 

 

0.024

0.024

0.20

Clover Leaf

 

 

 

0.506

 

 

 

 

 

0.506

0.506

4.12

Carat Gold

 

 

 

0.016

 

 

 

 

 

0,016

0.016

0.13

Frog/Snake skin

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.00

Cosmetics

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.033

0.077

0.151

0.261

0.087

2.13

Coconut Skin

 

 

 

 

0.030

0.072

0.073

0.004

 

0.179

0.045

1.46

Asstd. Native Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.080

0.015

0.095

0.048

0.77

Total

0.818

0.956

1.161

1.722

2.102

1.650

1.396

1.675

0.794

12.274

2.357

100.00

Source: DTI

 

Table III-29.   Export Performance, Gifts and Housewares Industry, (Volume in Million Kg.), Zamboanga City, 1992-1997 (January-July)

Product

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

% Share

Button Blanks

0.021

0.046

0.033

0.023

0.027

0.013

0.163

0.027

2.61

Shell Craft

0.089

0.163

0.385

0.350

0.271

0.166

1.424

0.237

22.80

D. Cowhide

0.005

0.005

0.006

0.007

0.007

0.004

0.034

0.006

0.54

Carabao Horn Stick

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.02

Rubber Cup lump

1.520

1.815

0.200

 

 

 

3.535

1.178

56.60

Ornamental Shell

 

0.015

0.012

0.086

0.169

0.041

0.323

0.065

5.17

Cosmetics

 

 

 

0.004

0.012

0.030

0.046

0.015

0.74

Asstd. Native Products

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.004

0.005

0.003

0.08

Mactan Stones

 

 

 

 

 

0.002

0.002

0.002

0.03

Shell Toys

 

0.012

 

 

 

 

0.012

0.012

0.19

Clover Leaf

0.374

 

 

 

 

 

0.374

0.374

5.99

Carat Gold

0.011

 

 

 

 

 

0.011

0.011

0.18

Frog/Snake skin

 

 

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coconut Skin

 

0.069

0.179

0.073

0.012

 

0.333

0.083

5.33

Total

2.021

2.125

0.816

0.543

0.499

0.260

6.263

2.014

100.00

 

 

The industry has high potentials due to the availability of various indigenous raw materials in the locality. It needs further support though in product promotion and market development especially on product development and access to trade information and trends. Similarly, financing assistance and skills development and improvement are needed to enhance the growth of the industry.

 

Emerging Industries

 

Processed Food

One industry with rising potentials is the processed food sector. Based on reports to date, about 2,000 hectares have been planted to various fruit trees giving rise to commercial fruit production by nine (9) identified large-scale producers and two (2) community-based organizations. These fruit trees produce mango, grapes, pomelo, bananas, papaya, pineapple, melons, marang, durian, jackfruit, guaple, calmansi and chico.

Several processing activities in the city center on banana chips production for domestic and export market. In recent years, there have been attempts to export processed food such as guava leaves powder, coffee beans, nata de coco, tropical fruit mix, frozen buko, and birds nest. Last year, the sector has exported fresh mango fruits. Though very minimal at the moment, the industry has high potentials due to the abundance of new materials for processing.

 

 

 

Table III-30.   Export Performance, Processed Food Volume (In Million Kgs.), Zamboanga City, 1992-1997 (January-July)

Product

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

% Share

Birds’ Nest

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.15

Nata de Coco

 

 

0.018

 

 

 

0.018

0.000

2.74

Frozen Buko

 

 

0.020

 

 

 

0.020

0.000

3.04

Fresh mango Fruit

 

 

 

 

0.023

0.260

0.283

0.142

43.01

Guava Leaves Powder

 

 

 

0.027

0.049

 

0.076

0.038

11.55

Bottled Sardines

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

 

0.002

0.001

0.30

Coffee Beans

 

 

 

0.139

0.073

0.046

0.258

0.106

39.21

Total

0.001

0.000

0.038

0.167

0.146

0.306

0.658

0.288

100.00

Source: DTI

 

For the past five years, the sector has total exports of US$ 1.008 million, and new investments of P1.100 million registered with the Board of Investments.

 

Table III-31.   Export Performance, Processed Food, Value in US$, Zamboanga City, 1982-1997 (January- July)

Product

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Total

Ave.

% Share

Birds’ Nest

0.001

 

 

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.10

Nata de Coco

 

 

0.031

 

 

 

0.031

0.031

3.07

Frozen Buko

 

 

0.001

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

0.10

Fresh mango Fruit

 

 

 

 

0.009

0.148

0.157

0.079

15.54

Guava Leaves Powder

 

 

 

0.067

0.122

 

0.189

0.095

18.71

Bottled Sardines

 

 

 

0.436

0.175

0.018

0.629

0.210

62.28

Coffee Beans

 

 

 

0.001

0.001

 

0.002

0.001

0.20

Total

0.001

0.000

0.032

0.503

0.306

0.166

1.010

0.416

100.00

Source: DTI

The industry needs more investments on technology for fruit processing and product packaging to ably complete in the world market. It also needs intensified product promotion and market development efforts, integration of raw materials supply and processing to ensure adequate supply of fruits for processing and improved agricultural productivity.

 

Ornamental Horticulture

There are about 27 identified growers engaged in commercial ornamental horticulture, with production estimated at an average of 53 dozens per month. On the aggregate, over 20 hectares are planted to orchids, anthuriums, roses and other cut flower varieties. Presently, total production is not even enough to meet the local demand for cut flowers

This industry, especially the cutflower sector, is in its infancy stage, but is a growing business activity. The major concerns of the sector include low production capacity, inadequate post-harvest handling and storage facilities, inadequate knowledge on new production technology and techniques, establishment of linkages with concerned agencies to facilitate entry of imported seed stocks, and assistance in the sourcing of additional capital

At present, the industry is faced with competition from large cutflower growers not only locally, but also in the foreign markets in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Japan.

 

Garments

Zamboanga City has seven garment manufacturers with estimated combined total investments of P10 million. It is a very small industry sector of the city, with the domestic market not yet fully tapped

Industry concerns include the modernization of technology and skills development and improvement to enhance product quality and productivity among others, so that they will be able to compete with manila and Cebu garment producers. Producers in the city have voiced the need for information on color and design trends.

 

Major Trading Activitie

The city has an age-long tradition of trading due to its strategic location along the trading route.

 

Conventional Tradin

When the barter trade, which the city had been known for, stopped, conventional trading intensified.

At present, there are nine cooperatives composed of Muslim traders engaged in conventional trading. However, only Zamboanga Barter Traders Kilusang Bayan, Inc. (ZBTKBI) is the regular importer of products. The other groups have no regular importation, and instead procure their requirements from ZBTKBI

Based on records, there are 25 vessels involved in this activity, with destinations such as Labuan, Malaysia and Bitung., Indonesia. These are shown in Table III-32. Zamboanga City serves as a transshipment point for “barter” goods brought to Davao City, General Santos City, Iloilo and Dumaguete.

There are approximately 3,000 active conventional traders based in Zamboanga City who primarily sell textile, garments, linen, umbrellas, brassware, ceramics, traveling bags and footwear.

In the city, there are five major conventional trade centers as shown in Table III-33. These are commonly known as “barter” trade centers as the types of goods have been previously associated with barter trade.

 

 

Table III-32.  Vessels Engaged in Trading and Destinations

Vessel

Destination

1. M/L “Araceli-II”

Labuan, Malaysia

2. M/L “Dayuna”

-do-

3. M/V “Fatima Tarhata”

-do-

4. M/L “Golden Sea Horse”

-do-

5. M/L “Hassanal II”

-do-

6. M/L “Indah Nas”

-do-

7. M/L “Lady  L Joy”

-do-

8. M/L “Lady Radz”

-do-

9. M/L “Lady Rhiwada”

-do-

10. M/L “Lady Treshia”

-do-

11. M/V “Lalathazzomar two”

Bitung, Indonesia

12. M/L “Marissa”

-do-

13. M/V “Mocking Bird”

-do-

14. M/L “Noorlia”

-do-

15. M/L Princess Tukay”

-do-

16. M/L “Rashada-II”

-do-

17. M/L “Saudian IV”

-do-

18. M/L “Sea Dayang 2”

-do-

19. M/L “Shila Weina 3”

Labuan, Malaysia

20. M/L “Sher-Sa”

-do-

21. M/L Totoh Salam”

-do-

22. M/L “Tripple J”

-do-

23. M/L “Vaniza”

-do-

24. M/V “Viking”

-do-

25. M/L “Al-Shizamin”

-do-

 

 

Table III-33.   Major “Barter” Trade Centers, Zamboanga City

Trade Centers

Approx. No. Of Stalls

Canelar Trading Center

900

Baliwasan Commercial Complex

400

Sta. Cruz Markeet

400

Zamboanga Multi-Trade Arcade

100

Sambagora

100

Total

1,900

 

 

According to key informants, goods traded in this scheme range froom P30 million to P100 million (US$ 100, 000) a month.

 

Domestic Trading

Zamboanga City serves as a trading and transshipment point for domestically traded products. The value of commodities loaded and unloaded at the ports reveals an increasing gap, depicting increased trading activities inbound rather than outbound.

From 1991-1993, there was an increasing trend in the quantity and value of coastwise cargo loaded and unloaded in the city. However, in 1994, both dropped drastically.

 

 

Table III-34.   Quantity And Value of Coastwise Cargo, Loaded and Unloaded, Zamboanga City, 1991-1994

Item

1991

1992

1993

1994

Cargo Loaded (‘000 MT) (million P)

Cargo Unloaded (‘000 MT) (million P)

275.03

3,336.98

490.58

4,904.31

3,532.40

3,532.40

586.02

5,928.86

2,401.26

2,401.26

786.27

5,112.63

261.18

4,055.06

404.69

4,601.54

 

Source: NSO, Community Flow in the Philippines

 

From 1991-1994, nearly half or 41.85% of outbound commodities comprised of food and live animals, valued at P5.3 million and P1.3 billion annual average, 16.9% were composed of crude inedible materials valued at P2.1 billion or P537 million annual average; and 12.6% included manufactured goods valued at P1.6 billion or P401 million average per year.

Food and live animals have been comprised mostly of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and aquatic invertebrates (dried fish and tuna) and cereals and cereal preparation (rice and flour), while crude inedible materials have been composed mostly of crude animal and vegetable materials such as seaweeds and algae. Manufacture goods traded outbound are largely non-metallic mineral manufactured like Portland cement.

For the same period, overall traded coastwise and outbound comprised largely of rice, dried fish, seaweeds and beverages.

 

Table III-35.   Coastwise Cargo Loaded Commodity (2-Digit Level Classification) With Highest Volume Per year, Zamboanga City, 1991-1994

 

Commodities

1991

1992

1993

1994

Food and Live Animals

Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and aquatic invertebrates, etc.

Cereals and cereal preparations

Cereal and cereal preparations

Cereals and cereal preparations

Beverages and Tobacco

Beverages

Beverages

Beverages

Beverages

Crude material, Inedible, except Fuels

Crude animal and vegetable materials, n.e.s.

Crude animal and vegetable materials, n.e.s.

Crude animal and vegetable materials, n.e.s.

Crude animal and vegetable materials, n.e.s.

Mineral Fuels, Lubricants & Related Materials

Petroleum, Petroleum products and related materials

Petroleum, Petroleum products and related materials

Petroleum, Petroleum products and related materials

Coals, cokes and briquettes

Animal and Vegetable Oils, Fats and Waxes

Fixed vegetables, fats & oils, crude, refined or fractionated

Fixed vegetables, fats & oils, crude, refined or fractionated

Fixed vegetables, fats & oils, crude, refined or fractionated

Fixed vegetables, fats & oils, crude, refined or fractionated

Chemicals and Related Products, N.E.S.

Fertilizers

Fertilizers

Chemical Materials & products, n.e.s.

Plastics in non-organic forms

Manufactured Goods classified chiefly by material

Non-metallic Mineral Manufactured, n.e.s.

Non-metallic Mineral Manufactured, n.e.s.

Non-metallic Mineral Manufactured, n.e.s.

Non-metallic Mineral Manufactured, n.e.s.

Machinery and transport Equipment

Road Vehicles

Road Vehicles

Road Vehicles

Road Vehicles

Miscellaneous Manufactured Articles

Miscellaneous Manufactures articles

Miscellaneous Manufactures articles

Miscellaneous Manufactures articles

Miscellaneous Manufactures articles

Commodities and Transactions, N.E.S.

Commodities and Transactions, N.E.S.

Commodities and Transactions, N.E.S.

Commodities and Transactions, N.E.S.

Commodities and Transactions, N.E.S.

 

 

Figure III-22.   Quantity of Coastwise Cargo Loaded and Unloaded, Zamboanga City, 1991-1994

 

 

 

 

Figure III-23.   Values of Coastwise Cargo Loaded by Commodity

(1-Digit Level Classification), Zamboanga City

 

 

 

Daily Markets

 

There are two (2) main public markets and 21 flea markets in the city where producers and traders bring goods and commodities to serve the daily needs of the populace.

The two (2) public markets are the Main Public Market and the Sta. Cruz Public market.

The main public Market has 47 stalls and 936 tables which sell basic and prime commodities such as fish and other seafood, vegetables, fruits, meat, bakery products, poultry products, rice, corn agricultural inputs, grocery items and refreshments.

The Sta. Cruz Public market has 663 stalls devoted to fish, meat, fruits, vegetables, used clothing, “barter” goods “carinderia” and cafeteria, and 36 permanent compartments for dry goods. Table III-=36 shows the number of stalls of the daily markets.

Table III-36.  Number of Stalls, Tables and Compartments, Main Public market and sta. Cruz Public Market, As of 1990, Zamboanga City

Market

Business Activity/Goods

No. of Stalls/Tables/Traded/Sold Compartments

Main Public Market

 

 

Row A

 

34 stalls

Row B

 

44 stalls

Row C

Rice/corn Retailers, Contractors, shops Liquors, Tobacco, Coffee, eggs, fruits/

Vegetables, Chicken, Feeds, Pastries

64 stalls

 

36 stalls

Row D

 

103 stalls

Row E

 

32 stalls

Row F

 

36 stalls

Row G

 

20 stalls

Row I

 

72 stalls

Row K

 

26 stalls

Row L

 

18 stalls

Main Public market (PPA

Reclaimed Area)

 

 

Building A

Fish

128 tables

Building B

Fish

80 tables

Building C

Fish

128 tables

Building D

Fruits/Vegetables

80 tables

Building E

Fruits/Vegetables

286 tables

Building F

Fruits/Vegetables

140 tables

Building G

Fruits/Vegetables

94 tables

Supermarket

 

 

Sta. Cruz Public Market

 

 

Building 1

Fish

108 stalls

 

Meat

74 stall

 

Fruits/Vegetables

20 stalls

Building 2

Fruits/Vegetables

43 stalls

 

Business Retailer

75 stall

Building 3

Business Retailer

30 stalls

 

Used Clothing (Ukay-Ukay)

106 stalls

Building 4

 

 

Left Wing (KRISLAM)

Conventional Trading/Barter Trade Section

84 stalls

Right Wing (Bansa Moro)

 

83 stalls

Building 5

Carinderia and Cafeteria

35 stalls

Dry Good Section

 

36 stalls

Open Plaza (Permanent)

Refreshment

5 stalls

 

Source: Office of the City Planning and Development Coordinator

 

To complement these public markets are privately owned flea markets located in various parts of the city. Based on Barangay land use Survey conducted. There are 84 identified flea markets ail over the city with Tetuan and Calarian having the most number. Licensed flea markets as of 14 may 1993 however. Reveal this information below in Table 111-37.

 

Table III-37.   Licensed Flea Markets, As of May 14, 1993, Zamboanga City

Business Name/Permittee

Location

Lucia Alvarez

Culianan

Mohaimin Bahasuan

Manicahan

Ramon Cabrera

Sta. Maria

DKD Livelihood & Manpower Service (SKUPA)

San Roque

Lourdes Falcatan

Don Alfaro St. Tetuan

Abdusalam Handi

Recodo

Hipolita E. Hipolito

San Roque

Baliwasan Commercial Complex

Baliwasan

Peregrino Macrohon Sr.

Talungatung

NARRA FLEA MARKET

Tugbungan

Alfonso Ongchua, Jr.

Labuan

Michael B. Perez

Manicahan (Mangusu)

Melchor Quintos

Curuan

Arnulfo delos Reyest

Putik

Rolando delos Reyes

Tumaga

Rolando delos Reyes

Guiwan

Jose G. Sta. Maria

Guiwan

Emma Rubio

Tagasilay

Jovita San Juan

Sta. Maria

Fe Villaneza

San Roque

Eduardo Saavedra

Tugbungan

           Source: Licensing Division, City Mayor’s Office

                           Complied by: Office of the City Planning & Development Coordinator        

 

                Other Support Services/Facilities

Zamboanga City, being the industrial growth center for Western Mindanao, has three (30 industrial/agri-industrial facilities, two (2) in the west coast: Ayala de Zamboanga Industrial park and Regional Agro-Industrial Center (AdZIP-RAIC), the Zamboanga City Special Economic Zone and Free Port (ZAMBOECOZONE), and one in the east coast, the Sangali Fishing Port Complex.   

 

Ayala de Zamboanga Industrial Park (AdZIP)

The AdZIP is the Regional Agri-Industrial Center (RAIC) of Western Mindanao and in 1997, was made a Special Economic Zone under the PEZA. It is privately owned industrial estate located in Barangay Ayala, which is approximately 15 kilometers from the Zamboanga International Airport and 16 kilometers from the Zamboanga Sea Port. It covers a total of 200 hectares distributed to the following uses:

 

 

 

Table III-38.   Land Uses of Ayala de Zamboanga Industrial Park

Land Uses

Area

Industrial and Special Economic Processing Zone

50 hectares

Residential (Housing project)

30 has.

                    (Low Density Housing)

20 has.

Commercial Complex

15 has.

Golf Course and Sport Facilities

70 has.

Mini Forest

15 has.

Source: Doing Business in Zamboanga City

                      

There are 215 Industrial lots at 1,800-2,000 square meters each for sale.

The residential area is composed of the following:

 

            Low cost housing with land area of 100-150 sq.m each & has a floor area of 25-42 sq.m.

            Middle-income housing that covers 12-15 has. The construction of which shall

                        Commence in 1998.      

            High-income housing will cover 20 has.; and shall start in the next year 3 years.

 

Common service facilities and the site utilities include a road system and paved areas designed to withstand the load of heavy cargo trucks. Paved areas include the Marshalling Lane with weighbridge station, parking areas and open storage areas or container yards.

 

On site utilities include the power system, waste water treatment plant and sewerage system. Other facilities include the following:

 

Electrical Power System

Power supply will be tapped from the 69-KV power line of the Zamboanga City Electric Company (ZAMCELCO). In support of the industrialization of the city and to augment power supply, installation of five (5) MVA power plant sub-station by ZAMCELCO and the 100 MVA power plants in Sangali by the National Power Corporation is ongoing and is expected to be completed by December 1997.

 

Telecommunications System

Telecommunication lines will include a PABX system at eh AdZIP Central Office. At present, more than 400 telephone units are available, but actual installation of telephone lines will take effect once locations move into the site.

 

Water System

A deep well has already been installed to serve the water requirements of the AdZIP. This shall be augmented by three (3) more deep wells to be operated by the Zamboanga City Water District, which will produce 2.000 gallons of water per minute. Recently., it has completed well exploration and development at La Paz and Ayala, which is expected to provide water to RAIC.

One of the critical off-site infrastructure support facilities s the Zamboanga International airport which has recently improved with the construction of a new passenger terminal building and the upgrading of its runway.

Similarly, Zamboanga City Port, the major port of entry for the peninsula, has been upgraded with the rehabilitation of the pier and the marginal wharf.

Priority investment areas of the RAIC include processed marine-based products, processed tropical fruit, gifts and Housewares, garments and other light industries.

 

Zamboanga City Special Economic Zone and Free Port (ZAMBOECOZONE)

The ZAMBOECOZONE (ZE) was created by virtue of Republic Act 7903 last 23 February 1995, but made operational a year later only. It is the only one in Visayas and Mindanao and envisioned to be the hub for economic activities and a springboard for the promotion of trade, investment and eco-tourism in the city and the region, thus bringing about socio-economic upliftment. As such, it is being developed as an agro-industrial, commercial, financial, investment and tourist center and free port with suitable retirement and residential areas.

The ZAMBOECOZONE is managed and operated by the Zamboanga City Special Economic Zone Authority or ZAMBOECOZONE Authority, a non-profit corporate body composed of a chairman/administrator, a vice-chairman who come from the national agency task coordinate and monitor special economic zones and the like in the country; and six members consisting of the City’s congressional representative; the Mayor of the City of Zamboanga, one (1) representative of the City Council; and one representative each from the domestic investors, foreign investors and labor in the ZAMBOECOZONE.

Envisioned development includes an international seaport and Freeport complex; industrial estates; commercial complex; housing; eco-tourism, agro-forestry and watershed; educational center; and sports and recreational center.

At present, the ecozone consists of a 15, 445.56 hectares area located in San Ramon and the Upper Pamucutan and La Paz logged over areas. Other proposed ecozone development sites are the Philippine Tourism Authority’s golf area, R.T. Lim Boulevard Reclamation and Zamboanga International Airport.

The initial developed area of 54.56 hectares in San Ramon has already two (2) locators such as the FABRECO Corporation and the Mabuhay Satellite. The 15, 391 hectares in Upper Pamucutan and La Paz logged areas which were recently been proclaimed as part of the ecozone will be developed as a mountain/forest resort similar to Baguio City for industries, commercial uses, golf courses, eco-tourism, and agro-tourism (fruit plantation). However, the 978 hectares of old growth or primary forest and the 5, 666.75 hectares of second growth logged over areas shall be reserved and devoted as watersheds.

Recently, there has been letters of intent for the 700 has. of virgin forest in the Upper Pamucutan for eco-tourism to include a 200-hectare for a deer farm, 200-hectare goat farm, 200-hectare for cutflower farm and bird park/aviary.

The golf area of the Philippine Tourism Authority at Pasonanca Park (76 hectares) is also being considered for the development as site for hotels, bungalows, casino, golf courses and the like.

The R.T. Lim Boulevard Reclamation area of about 12 hectares is also being considered for the development as a showcase for tourist, with hotel, multi-purpose civic center for trade fair, conventions, sports and civic activities, commercial center, theme park and marina.

Ecozone enterprises can freely engage in any business, trade, manufacturing, and financial or service activity and to import and export freely all types of goods into and out of the ecozone.

Target industries are light such as garments, computer, fiberglass, reconditioning of motor vehicles, food processing such as aqua-marine/mango and banana.

On site infrastructure support such as the road network and waterline have been planned and are now in various phases of development. In particular, the road network shall feature fruit trees along the roads. A Master Development Plan is now being prepared for the ecozone.

Zamboanga City Economic Zones Map

Due to nature of its operation, the much-needed off-site infrastructure is a seaport. Potential areas for the seaport include Recodo to serve as alternate port for servicing other vessels especially during inclement weather, and San Ramon for cargo loading and unloading.

The construction of the San Ramon-Culianan Circumferential Road would provide direct access to the east coast and to limit the interference of tractor-trailers with the urban transport traffic flow.

 

Sangali Fishing Port Complex

The Sangali Fishing Port Complex is located in Sangali, which is about 32 kilometers east of the city proper. it is equipped with an efficient fish unloading system, systematic berthing procedures and boat traffic at harbor. It has the following facilities and utilities, namely:

            A 160-meter multipurpose pier

            A 308-meter landing quay

            Slipway and winch house

            Refrigeration building which contains

            35 mt/day ice maker

            50 mt/day ice storage

            150 mt ice storage

            70 mt cold storage (-5°C)

500 mt cold storage (-35°C)

units of contact freezer

10 mt/16 hr brine freezer

ice crusher

a 1,300 sq. m. market hall

support facilities such as water supply system, and shops for carpentry, foundry and   

            engine/machine/electrical needs.

 

The components in the complex produce about 357. 45 MT/month of frozen squid, abalone meat, octopus and fish.

            SMI Fish Industry

Super Real Marketing

Marine Commercial

RFM Corporation

LC Fish Company

Alteza Marine International

OR Crestying

Oro Marine Resources, Inc.

Shie Jie Corporation

JRMC Home Industry

SUNRISE Export

Jermand Corporation

Alto Marine Export

OR Export-Import

 

These firms sell their products in both local and foreign markets. Due to the high demand for these products, this facility seems inadequate. The refrigerated vans for transporting the produce abroad are also not enough.


           2.3.3.3    Employment

Labor Force Employment

As of 1996, Zamboanga City has a labor force of 178, 000, 93.82% of whom are employed. For the past eight years, unemployment rate has been erratic. It was highest in 1989, at 18.9%, and lowest in 1991 at 4.2%. Compared with the regional unemployment rate, the city’s unemployment level is higher and has historically been the highest in the region.

 

Occupation Group

Based on the 1990 Census of Population and Housing, there were 166, 996 household population 15 years old and over. Categorized by major occupation group, elementary occupations such as market stall vendors/street vendors and related workers, domestic helpers, and laborers headed the list of gainful occupation for the population at 12.21% or 32, 605 people. The farmers, forestry workers and fisherman, which totaled 31, 592 or 11.83%, follow this. Of this group, crop farmers were the most numerous, followed by aqua-farm activities.

Table III-39.   Labor Force, Employed and Unemployed Rate

Item

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

Zamboanga City

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labor force

148

140

166

157

156

161

170

178

Employed

120

125

159

149

144

143

157

167

Unemployed

28

15

7

8

12

18

13

11

Unemployment Rate